This page features educational resources for teachers and students developed specifically for this site, as well as a collection of links to the most relevant and authoritative resources available elsewhere on the Web.



Glossary

Wondering how to tell a transit from a transect, what anthropology has to do with archaeology, or what the difference is between absolute and relative dating? The Glossary serves as a guide to the less familiar or more technical terms that appear throughout the site.

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Preservation

Archaeological sites located on private property often remain unknown and unreported, subject to damage or demolition. The Preservation page explains how you can play an important part in identifying and preserving Mississippi's rich heritage. Included are tips on how to spot archaeological evidence, guidelines for reporting a potential site, and contact information for experts.

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Indian Tribes of Mississippi

There were twenty-one known Indian tribes in the area of present day Mississippi between the years 1500 and 1800. Most were small, numbering only a few hundred, and many did not survive the territorial conflicts between French and English allied groups of the 18th century. There is some mystery concerning what became of the earlier chiefdoms of the De Soto period in the early 1500s during the hiatus of exploration between then and the later French and English intrusions into the area in the late 1600s. Some remnants may have joined or given rise to some of the tribes described below...

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Cultural Phases

This page provides a condensed timeline of named cultures and cultural phases in Mississippi during prehistoric and early historic times. Also included are links to downloadable PDF versions of Mississippi's official State Historic Context document, which summarizes the state of current archaeological knowledge about Mississippi's cultural history.

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Survey Tools

From metal detectors to magnetometers to ground-penetrating radar, this page describes and illustrates the most important tools of the trade used by archaeologists surveying potential or confirmed sites.

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